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, please. >> item number 4, status update on the study on how jurisdictions fill vacancies to elected offices between election cycles. >> jason fried, lafco staff, at the last meeting, you instructed to start this study of figuring out how when elected positions become vacant mid cycle how we fill those. we have since then brought on an intern research intern from usf, spencer who's sitting there with us today, we're at the stage right now, the goal just to give you a very quick brief overview of what we're looking at doing is we're looking at various different types of systems because there's no place like san francisco, which is a city and county in california and that has an independently elected mayor, what we're doing is breaking this study down to multiple categories to try to find similar things with san francisco, so we're looking at other locations that have large populations that are about the city and county, other places in the country, there are places like arlington, virginia, colorado, we're looking how they replace their positions in the county there. we're also going
. >> well-done. good job. >> coming up on c-span2, a look at egypt's parliamentary elections next month. that is followed by comcast ceo brian roberts on the future of cable and where technology is headed. then a look at the 10th anniversary of the iraq war with a discussion of how it has changed the middle east. and with congress on its spring recess this week we'll take the opportunity to show you booktv in prime time every week night. tonight, three books on u.s. innovation. it begins at 8:30 eastern. >> let's got straight to a personal topic. it has been, you've been on the commission since 2006. the chairman has been on i believe since 2009. his term is up. yours will be up next year. should we expect to see some turnover at the commission? >> you always expect to see turnover at the commission because we all have staggered terms. >> right. >> the past six years flown by very quickly and, we shall see. stay tuned. i get asked this question every couple of years. and when you've been there almost seven years you get asked at inflection points about this. i openly thinking about it b
soul searching, particularly if you have an election like 2012 where there were a lot of things that made you feel like republicans could have won. not very popular. you have a very weak economy. it was interesting that in the obama recovery, family income went down to $2,500 a year, where during the recession, income went down $1,500 a year. families were doing worse, yet extremely good campaign, and he won despite his disadvantages and he won frankly in a predictable way. he made the election about his opponent. the romney people allowed obama to define romney. this was rather than romney defining romney, and that is why it is important for republicans we do wrong? the idea that the republican party is in some terrible shape -- certainly i do not buy that. not buy that? >> i do not. i have been around since 1968. i have seen terrible shape. i remember watergate, i remember when the 13% of americans republicans, and the national if we should change the name of the party. whispereds not been now. >> for 40 years, the most number of republicans in the house was 192. today we have
university law society and the first female student to be elected and by this stage i was interested in social change. in ireland at that time time, there was a total equation of crime and i felt this was not allowing the private individual morality and also that there were non catholics and we should open up to minorities to respect to the viewpoint so in my inaugural address on law and morality i need some -- i made some recommendations we should legalize family planning and should not criminalize consenting behavior and we should not have suicide as a crime. i remember the speech caused in quite a fuss as it was new to the examination of the move to slightly larger audiences there was the moment of silence when i finished it i was worried they're less more than a decent applies but the thought was that is what students do maybe i have been more outspoken than others but then i was lucky to get fellowship to harvard university that was a wonderful year to be in harvard when i found they were questioning the immoral for of vietnam and escape -- is keeping the draft some of the civil
year's afghan election where karzai will not be a candidate will be free and fair. >> the united states of america is committed beyond 2014 to the government of afghanistan to this legitimate democratic political process. the taliban can choose to be part of that. they know how. >> sunday found kerry in baghdad where he conveyed washington growing displeasure with the way the both of iraqi prime minister permitted iraqi air space used by iran for deliveries of weapons and foreign fighters to the regime of bashar assad in syria. >> there are members of congress and people in america who increasingly are watching what iraq is doing. and wondering how it is that a partner in effort for democracy and partner for whom miles per hours feel they have try -- americans feel they have tried hard to be helpful, how the country could do something that makes it difficult to achieve the common goals. >> in syria, the weekend brought word that assad was badly injured and sheikh fatig the civilian leader who appeared aside kerry in rome three weeks ago announced his res eg resignatio. >> the announceme
many law enforcement officers across the nation. elected officials and the citizens have asked us, what can we do to make our nation a safer place? and background checks is one effective way of making that happen. a capacity on these magazines and certainly we continue to be seeking a ban on these assault weapons as well. in this case, bloomberg is on the mark. >> what do you do when you get a call there's some criminal out there, an assailant of some kind who's got a semiautomatic weapon in his hands? what do you do? do you have to escalate the police response? have to arm men up to the teeth? how do you do it? i want to give people a sense of this. what's a police patrolman carry in baltimore county? >> certainly what we've had to do over the years is we've upgraded from a resolver i used to carry and i was a rookie officer to a semiautomatic weapon. we've used the shotgun in place for many years. we upgraded to a patrol rifle, an assault rifle with a magazine of about 30. in fact, i don't think there's any place where more than 30 in law enforcement for a number of reasons. but in ba
because we learned from last year's elections that a decade ago, two decades ago is no longer what some of those states in terms of the electorate has become. and i think you could galvanize your vote if you took some stands in some of those states. >> congressman? >> look, the way the mayor's doing this is the way he ought to do it. i'm a democrat. i want democrats to be in a majority. but there comes a time when politics must not supersede that which is right. the majority of us in this country believes the direction we're going in terms of universal background checks is the right thing to do. if some democrats fall or stand in the way, so be it. i want to be in the majority. it's not fun in the minority. but i also would like to have a society where we're not scheduling almost some kind of tragedy every other month. >> no problem with that at all with me. i agree with you, because the majority is a wonderful thing to have but if we cannot stand up when babies are shot in newtown and children are shot in the streets of chicago, over 500 last year, then what are we in the majority for
, we will move on to item number 4. discussion and possible action to elect bic officers. 4a, waiver of bic rules to hold bic offer certificate election on a different date, 4b, election of president, 4c, election of vice president. >> so, we wanted to get some action on waiving the rules of the commission because we wanted to postpone the election of the board president and vice president till the next meeting when more commissioners could be present. >> i move to waive the rules and hold our officer elections at the next meeting to accommodate a full commission. >> i second that. >> we have a motion and a second to waive the rules. is there any public comment on this item? are all commissioners in favor? >> aye. >> any opposed? the motion carries. item number 5, discussion of mou between dbi and the san francisco housing authority and the housing tenant complaint report process. >> thank you. i guess i was the one that asked that this be put on the agenda because, as we've all read about, there's been a lot of reports of problems at some of the housing projects in san francisco and
. >> of course that is exactly what the strategy seems to have been in the last two election cycles is to write off vast swaths of the population. jonathan, i want to talk about the politics of this before we have to go. that is, obviously on the democratic party side, i mean, this is kind of a, you know, no brainer gate issue i would say for someone seeking the nomination on the democratic ticket. on the republican side, though, i'm not sure i agree with karl rove that the person who is their nominee would be an advocate. it certainly seems like it's going to be a much tougher issue in 2016 for someone seeking national office, given the numbers that chad was just talking about. >> very tough for someone on the republican side to not be in favor of marriage equality? >> correct. i mean, given the fund-raising issues. this is an area where republicans are raising a lot of money. it's obviously an area where vast swaths of the population have changed their opinion. >> right. >> i think it's going to be a harder position for republican in 2016. >> well, yes. if not 2016, certainly by 2020. look, i
to the specifics. watch for the senators from red states up for re-election and the pressure is greatest on them. they are away two weeks now from washington, back home, and there will be pressure on them. they will hear from their constituents about what to do from this. if you don't have much support, if any, among republicans, you need those democrats to get it through. >> hey, mark, give me a sense of harry reid's role in this. he wants to keep that title senate majority leader. navigating through these ice floes of this. >> it's already on the side of those who would like to see a large package, including a pretty big risk background check provision. it's not clear to me what more opponents can be to put pressure on senator reid. senator reid has a long history with the nra. they did not support him in his re-election race and i think he is looking for a path that not only protects his own views on gun control and not only tries to accommodate the white house but try to protect the majority. i think he is very stensive not just on guns but a range of issues too. all of these democrats are u
was not a referendum on barack obama. the referendum on barack obama was the presidential election and look at the turnout -- the people that came out for him. you continue to misread the results. >> i hate to agree with you because you are trying to disagree with me, so it gets really complicated here. [laughter] i agree with you that barack obama is one of the great candidates in american history and that explains why the democrats did so well in 2008 and 2012 -- we had a great candidate -- in 2010, when you neutralize the factor of the candidate, the republicans prevailed, which tells me that republican ideas are strong, and you have to have a candidate or a class of people that can explain it. >> that is the subject of the message to the american people, and they bought it. >> but in 2010, obamacare was a factor and it will be a factor in 2014, do you not agree? >> it might very well be, but i will point out that we have returned to the days of yesteryear when dr. krauthammer was laboring in the democratic vineyards, and the explanation was ronald reagan won because he was a superior ca
father and willie were acquaintances and fraternity brothers. >> when he was elected the first african american mayor i was right up there front and center in 1996 and channel five was out there reporting and they included me in the news coverage and interviewed me and i was historical and crying and emotional and the camera lingered on my black power fist. and fast forward for when i was in washington, d.c. when i was there for barack obama first inauguration and there i went with my fist again more tears flowing and i was not the only one thinking about the shoulders on which the president stood, including those of mayor brown who without question paved the way for president obama and countness others. so today we celebrate all that he is and all that he has done and all that he continues to do. the san francisco mayor's office of neighborhood services truly appreciates the generous support it has received during this 2013 black history month and so right now, i would like to take a moment and acknowledge our sponsors for today's event, san francisco firefighter local 798. the san f
. coming up next, michael steele former chairman of the rnc party. he will weigh in on the 2012 election and ralph nader, a consumer, advocate, and past president of canada will look at the disparity between ceo pay and minimum-wage. we will be right back. >> going straight to a personal poppet. 11 on the commission since 2006. the chairman has been on since late 2009. his term is up. yours will be of next year. should we expect to see turnover at the commission? >> we do not have staggered terms. the past six years has flown by very quickly. and we shall see. i get asked this question every couple of years. we of been there almost seven years. inflection points like this. we shall see. shall see what? >> about what to do next. i did not think we should stay in these positions for ever, but at the same time, i love my job. that is part of what is keeping me here. we of a lot of a born work to do. of important work to do. we spoke with the commissioners before his announcement. hear more tonight on "the communicators." tonight on first ladies, called a bigamist and adults were during her
, the economy is waiting to be unlocked. enthey went on to say that's why we desperately need to you elect at least 17 democrats. 17 democrats in the house would give them the majority come 2014. >> yeah. look, it is a very, very ambitious goal. i believe the last time that the president has won that number of house seats in a six-year election, a mid, six year midterm was 1822. he has got his work cut out for him. i would suggest joe biden remember, house republicans were elected to do a job too. and they're doing, for their constituents exactly what they said they would do in the last election. so it is not as if republicans would bend to the president's will simply because he won an election. bill: that point is that the focus is on the debt. which one might argue would not be there unless you had house republicans pushing for that or at least holding the line. one final point, you say biden has given the game up here. what does that mean? >> yeah, look, i just think if there were a real charm offensive, if they actually wanted to find a deal, what would you not see is the vice presiden
be helpful in this role is that i served as an elected school board member in new haven unified school district for two terms including serving as the president. i was the elected auditor at the city of alameda. i served on the citizens oversight committee and the citizens watchdog committee of the alameda county transportation commission. again, overseeing this exact kind of situation of bond funding and grant funding. i served as the president of the [speaker not understood] community college foundation. i served as the treasurer of the oakland chamber of commerce, many other boards and commissions. and, so, i feel like i could step into this position and play a helpful role quickly. i certainly understand the exact purpose of the committee related to assuring that the dollars are spent in accordance with the agreement set up with the community when they voted to approve the bond. so, assuring the public trust, assuring that new bonds can be approved when the city decides to go back and ask for more bond from the community and assuring that the bond rating of the city remains strong.
in election year but the way they did it was horrible. what they should have done is guarantee at the beginning those 100,000 euro deforests, anything above that they'd get shares in the new bank. you might take a hair cut but normally when a bank goes under, the creditors get shares in a new bank. these guys are just wiped out with no hope of recovery. >> so, the concern here is not so much cyprus itself which after all is the third smallest economy in europe, it's a tiny little island of less than a million people, is it to you more the indication that european leaders still haven't worked out how to deal with their financial problems? >> that is a good summation. they haven't. cyprus, we've known for nine months, was in trouble. they had plenty of time to cobble something together that wouldn't precipitate a panic or set the conditions for panic in the future. one of the things that the germans have not recognized yet is that piling on taxes on the private sector just deepens these recessions and makes them more severe than necessary. we haven't seen such foolry in my mind s
or $20 million in every election cycle literally buys vehicles, because the american public doesn't president in our democracy. if the listeners out there did one thing and one thing only one take away right now, it's call the -- the congress the switchboard, 202-224-3121, ask to speak to your elected officials wherever you are from whatever state, whatever district, and tell them to stand up to the gun industry. stand up to the nra and their nonsense that is killing 87 americans every day, require a background check for gun sales, prohibit the sale of magazine ammunition magazines, you know, over ten rounds when police are carrying 13 and are out gunned by criminals, and then let's bring the assault weapon ban up for a vote. it's the common denominator used in all of the major mass shootings in public places, the american people want it, the majority of gun owners support it, and it's simply the nra and their blood money contributors and the gun industry that are keeping our kids from dying unnecessarily from gun violence. >> michael: i was so frustrated
a film about the election in 2008, and went around the country interviewing members of congress about why they thought more young people weren't voting, and trying to get my peers to vote, which led into starting an organization called generation 18, which registered 25,000 new voters in 2008, and then we did a similar film in 2012, and while doing all that i went to nyu, where i graduated. >> host: i understand we both were part of the same program there? >> guest: yes. we both went to gal latin. >> it allows you to craft your own discipline and you can cross-discipline. >> guest: my concentration was the intersection of film, technology and politics, with an emphasis on youth and social change. >> host: so your dedication page read in part, to my mother and father, the greatest boomers i know. let talk about their generation for a minute. the different mistakes they may have made. what's you're overall read on baby-boomers. >> guest: the boomer generation is an incredibly important generation in our nation's history. much of what is going on today in america would not have been possib
to encourage him, saying it was his legacy, his historic role to have real elections and turn power over at the end of his term. the other issues, tough issues involved one resolution today, which was the turnover of the bagram from american control to afghan control, a big sticking point with president karzai. i asked both of them about the fact that there are high-value detainees, very dangerous prisoners, that the u.s. considers very dangerous, now turned over to afghan control, did the u.s. have veto power over afghan release of these prisoners? kerry said he was confident that they would have consultations. and that they would not be release of these kinds of prisoners, karzai made it clear that this is matter of afghan sovereignty. he said the u.s. is going to share intelligence, that the military had worked out sharing of information, and that they would be consulting, but obviously there's no american veto any more over whether or not these high-value prisoners, suspected taliban figures will be released. there's a lot of talk about the taliban. mutual agreement that it is a good
. from that they decided should go make a film about the election in 2008 and interviewing members of congress to get my peers to vote which led to starting an organization which took around the film registered voters in 2008 and a similar film and while doing all that i went to nyu where i graduated. >> i understand we were part of the same program. >> guest: yes i highly recommend it. >> host: it allows you to craft your own curriculum and you can cross disciplines. so what did you do? >> guest: my concentration with the intersection of film technology and politics was an emphasis on social change. >> host: so it sounds like your dedication page reads in part to my mother and father the greatest that i know. let's talk about the generation for a minute because they get some flax for mistakes they have made. what is your read on baby boomers. it is and was an incredibly generation in the history. much of what is going on today in america would not have been possible without them. the civil rights movement which they played a leading role in pushing it forward and ending the war in
think a government without another election is possible, they can bring together a coalition at the moment without an election? >> well, it really sdpents who they're going to be, the ministers, who are you going to support from outside the government. there are lots of -- three or four different -- >> permutations. >> exactly. we'll see. if not, we have to come back to general elections. >> okay. and how would investors view the prospects of -- >> general elections? >> general elections. >> we're going to drop probably another 70 basis points, we'll go back to 330, 350. >> that's manageable. >> well, it's where -- it's well manageable because we've already seen it. we are not going to come back to 7% or on 8%. >> good to see you. thanks for joining us. >> thank you very much. >> we'll take a short break. still to come, plenty more on cyprus. let's remind you of where futures are ahead of the wall street open a little later today. "worldwide exchange" continues after the break. >>> you're watching "worldwide exchange." these are the headlines today from around the world. a re
you call an organization that has over 900 elected mayors from around the country a front organization. it's a group of people that -- lou: what do you call it? >> it's the group that dealt with gun violence, but it's, you know, when you get something like 95 #% of the american people supporting bkdz checks, 85% of gun owners support it, 80% of the nra members support it, but congress has reluctance because of the nra. it shows the will of the people -- lou: do you really believe they are so afraid of the nra, or do you believe that they have some conscious towards their con stitch wents and want to represent the values and desires of the constituents? i mean, are you really writing off all those people in the senate and the house of representatives and saying they are nothing more than cowardly fools at the service of the nra rather than voting their conscious? >> i would not call them "cowardly fools," but i have ran for office and been elected for office, and it's not an issue that they know the background of or cares about, that a lot of times they look at the intensity of the oppo
anything, she wondered incredulously. he voted for lyndon johnson in the presidential election the first time so the whispers went that he ever cast such a mainstream coach for fear that a victory -- for the conservative republican barry goldwater would bring fascism to america. in eliot's opinion that was a bit overblown. increasingly appalled by the school's ideological slant, eliot began to vocalize his own political view to the he debated with his classmates in the basement cafeteria his chief opponent to the component was paul horowitz. his equal and intellectual in love of the good fight to the impromptu discussions often ended in shouting matches between the two. a hot topic in the lunchroom debate was cuba and the leader fidel castro who had come to power in 1959. most students saw castro as a romantic revolutionary bringing economic and social justice to his people. elite viewed him as another standard issue communist dictator. angela davis, mr. protagonist, was in the class of 1961. the class included robert deniro for a time. his parents were artists that lived in the village,
happened in the last election. all they have done is successfully identified that they need more hispanics and otherwise kickoff the conservatives within the party. chris: how much did that cost to figure that out? >> you're going to give me grief about this. at the white house they are talking about barack obama taking a big trip to africa, this year or next year. there is a lot of debate about which country he picks. chris: i would love to go. >> the white house won't talk about it officially. the president has commissioned a speech on the targeted killing policies which is a source of controversy. personally, it won't change that much. it's an effort to have more transparency. chris: that's a tricky one on the left and right joining together. the big question of the week, when the supreme court takes up gay marriage this had comingwee opinion? be right back. chris: welcome back, the u.s. supreme court takes up gay marriage this week. the big question for us, with polls showing big jumps in public approval for gay marriage, will this court band to move with history or lag behind history?
elections at a time when violence is on the rise. >>> back here in the u.s., we're watching a lot of weather. bill karins here with a look at the northeast. you say you're promising this will be the last time. >> it has to be, right? >> i hope you're right. >> ten inches of snow in denver, nine in condition can city. st. louis had 12 inches. this isn't your average snowstorm. st. louis is not a very snowy city. they got a foot of snow. it was the most snow they've had in one single storm going back since 1982. and here it was, the end of march. st. louis should typically be about 60 degrees. i think you get the gist. the storm is moving through the ohio valley, now hitting maryland, d.c. and maryland. we've picked up as much as three to four inches in some areas of maryland. that's pushing into philadelphia and new jersey. the storm will be gone by tomorrow. indianapolis and columbus, around six inches there. d.c. will probably end up with two to four. same with maryland. philadelphia and new york city, a little less. one to two inches. big, huge airports get enough delays, it will ripple ac
is perhaps the most important event in the election.paign, the april 5, 2014. we can talk about what role isaf will have in that. they will provide unprecedented and unparalleled security to this election. isaf's numbers draw down, setting the conditions for the enduring presence force, nato is when the college resolute, setting the conditions will the terms of the capabilities and locations of the platform so that force can be ready to go on the first of january 2013, fully integrated with the afghans in terms of the advisory relationship they will have. 2013 is the year to set the conditions for 2014. 2014 will be the year return and eight i -- will be the year where we terminate the isaf mission. >> i would ask those of you who like to speak to bring up some of the other central issues such as our relationship with president carter side. karzai.president this is a two part question building on what you just said. i would like asking a simple down-to-earth basic question, do the afghan party -- to the afghan army and police fight? the strategy is very well constructed and you have had
winds down over the next 29 months and the need for transparency and fairness in the upcoming elections. for the first time in 12 years hamid karzai will not appear on the ballot. over the weekend jon mentioned secretary kerry met with another leader that. iraqi's leader, nouriel malaki. he wants iran to stop using iraqi airspace to deliver foreign fighters to the fighters and the regime in damascus. >> may made it clear members of congress and people in america are increasingly watching what iraq is doing and wondering how it is that a partner in the efforts for democracy and a partner for whom americans feel they have tried so hard to be helpful, how that country can be in fact doing something that makes it more difficult to achieve our common goals? >> reporter: so far however the shiite-dominated malaki government has not closed its airspace to the shiite regime in tehran. follow me on twitter at at james rosen@fnc i will tell you who else from the iraqi government recently got the same message. jon and jenna. jon: james rosen, thank you. we'll have more on secretary kerry's surpris
board of supervisors, someone from the day when he was elected he became involved in this project chaming it for all of us, not just a place where we can work but also a place where we can be entertained and enjoy it and it's so important for him that this terminal and this site is fullness for the fabric of the city and i would leak like to say a special thank you to the board of supervisors david chew. >> thank you. i would like to welcome you to the most beautiful district of san francisco. i'm sorry kim and i were late because we left a meeting that is still going on right now. 21 years ago i visited san francisco for the first time as a tourist. i walked along these piers, i decided that i had to live in san francisco some day. it is so amazing to me to be able to wake up and represent the district that includes some of the most beautiful neighborhoods in the city that includes this water front. as monique alluded as i ran in 2008, my constituents said what are you going to do to make sure this doesn't fall into the water piers. with the jefferson project moving forward and
're >> they are certainly concerned with it. social media was very important for the election. it remains to be seen how it will hit into governing. they have not been able to make it work for them, for governing. but every president in a modern period has wanted to go around the white house press corps. in the eisenhower administration, when they made their press conference transcripts on the record in 1953 and on television in 1955, the press secretary was interested in getting things out directly. in one of his diary entries he said, we will go directly to the people. that has repeated itself from one administration to the next. the white house press corps continues to be important because those are the people on the ground writing about what it is the president is doing about the policies that he is initiating and what is going on within the white house. that information spreads. you can have something like the huffington post that will be pushing up articles that are in the new york times. i would be wary in thinking i could simply go around them as the white house press corps is irrelevant. it rem
of the capital. fighters said they want to hold democratic elections and urged civilians to remain calm. confusion, anger, and retribution. leftis what rebel fighters in their hunt for the capital. a man under attack is expected of being a rebel supporter. 70 kilometers outside the capital, the damage to buildings and the dead. south african forces have tried but failed to stop the advance. in the capital, pictures of what happened when the rebels took the city. it is feared the sort of retribution government supporters made out to their attackers will be overtaken by reprisals, score settling, along with looting. >> they have cut our phone networks. they are telling us, raping us, polluting. they are not allowing us to live. they have taken the state hostage. he had become an unpopular president, especially outside the capital. 10 years after he took power, he has suffered the same fate. only 10 weeks after the signing of a new power-sharing of peace deal. amidst celebrations, there was hope of some desperately needed stability. what was to follow was more death, more chaos, and suffer
% but obama was elected and approval was 92% was that a population of haters? no. they to make discriminating judgments on the basis of how they assess the new leader of the same country so western europeans were unhappy with the leader they saw as an inarticulate proponent of unilateral action and who had a swagger in his step and not interested in their opinion and when the president left office in the new president seemed to be very good at articulating why it was in u.s. interest to be a multi a latterly, seek cooperation with other countries and embody a set of ideals about america as the united states is a land of opportunity all of a sudden it was very popular so there is not the deep and underlying consistent hatred of united states but it is rare. but foreigners can make distinguishing judgments of different aspects and behave accordingly. >>host: why should we care which germans think? when is the last time we were asked what we thought of angela merkle? >>guest: many in germany are interested in american opinion. this is true. >>host: but why? >>guest: because the united states has
? absolutely. it is problematic making him the face of the issue. he did well in the last year's elections as well as special election in chicago. >> right. >> but wasn't the face of it. taking a big northeast mayor and putting him in the middle of some of these swing states and some senators that are going to be facing re-election, red state senators who are democrats, that's a problem. >> ken, let's talk about the momentum that susan is talking about. senator mccain emerges as a key player in the debate now, i want your thoughts on that, top of the list who could sign onto expanded background checks. also have gabby giffords and her husband were guests at the state of the union. they said this is the guy we want on our side. when you look at the momentum, three months on since newtown, has it shifted? is it now in the balance of those who advocate for gun ownership? >> yeah, i would say so. some of that was inevitable. i don't know if it is fully in the hands of those that support gun ownership and oppose additional restrictions, but clearly the momentum has diminished somewhat. we see t
with the american people and that will get you elected, but not this type of attitude now where the president gives with one hand and takes away with the other. the american people are smart. they're looking for results and not looking for finger pointing. election of 2012 is over. >> megyn: what happened was the president and the republicans had this war over first it was the fiscal cliff and the president kind of won that one and then it was the sequester and the president didn't really win that one and then his poll numbers started to drop precipitously and then came the charm offensive. >> well, we're only, you know, like a week after the charm offensive took place, so, what is motivating joe biden to be so off-message regarding the number one in charge. >> it was a democratic national committee campaign event which obviously is a partisan committee, but he to get republican election-- >> and there are cameras. >> i understand that, but he appeals to people in order he needs to get the house back and i'm very certain if paul ryan, john boehner, or mitch mcconnell went to rnc-- >> are they on th
location. it's always the location over the last years or so, an elective family has reached out to include an -- array of people. in january it was chinese new years celebration and now we are doing black history month. in about five weeks we'll be doing the cherry blossom festival which is japan's town and and then carnival and then we follow that almost instantly in june with this incredible occasion where the whole world see's how san francisco is when you get 300,000 bikes leading a parade of gay lesbians when we have our pride parade in san francisco and we eventually got around to letting the italians do something in october. so it's an incredible city. it's just an incredible city. i marvel he asked me what do you think the republicans call you black history month? i start to think, republicans, black history month, what could they call it? before i can answer he said february. [ laughter ] but we call it black history month here in san francisco and we mean it's black history month in san francisco and am indeed delighted that i'm being honored and i'm looking forward to the nex
grant starting when he was agenda and help to getting elected president twice. nast loved being close to the white house but he also had a true and tender affection for grant as a man, and they occasionally entertain one another. so president grant sometimes came to morristown but one example was after grant's world tour, when he ended his presidency, was not a great time in his life, he went on a world tour in a foreign was super excited. he gets home and comes to them in morristown and nast says, sal wants to know what he wants. and grant says, if he knew what they had served me all around the world, all i want is corn beef and cabbage. that's what the server to the president of the next eight. that's what he wanted. evidently he was very satisfied. so that's a lot of people that you didn't come to hear about, but so what. i would say that his wide circle of friends which this is a tiny sample helps to demonstrate the way that 19th century networks operated. humorous the writer to editor to politician activist to preacher. and on from there. the way in which nast stood at the center
caskill, a red state democrat who just got re-elected, now six years away from being re-elected. you know, she could have done it six months ago and didn't. >> it's true. but even president obama just came to this. >> true. >> may of last year. and let's look back to may of last year when he did this. there was a lot of commentary about whether this would hurt him in the election. we now have gotten past one presidential election. it didn't hurt him. people thought it helped him. so i think that's really taken some of the sting out of democrats, certainly, coming out. and even republicans. >> and danielle, for your party, for democrats, hillary clinton last -- a week ago monday, a week ago today, came out and said i support gay marriage. is there a penalty in the party for being more of a late arriver on this issue? >> i don't think there will be. i think what matters at the end of the day, you arrive at the right position. so even if you were the first or last, i don't think it necessarily matters. but i do think that, you know, there is a difference between parties. and i think that democrat
.ll >> rose: so then bush-- there was an election in 2008, and barack obama was elected president. he come spodz office with what assumptions about iraq, and how did his views on iraq play out? >> well, president obama, as a candidate-- and i interviewed him twice on iraq, single subject, as a candidate-- his view was he campaigned on ae platform of taking all of the american combat brigades out inn 16 months with a date certain. >> rose: okay, then he gets into power, and he withdraws the troops. and then there are negotiations to leave some troops, which yous you believe was a significantwa mistake, that negotiation failed. and so they did not leave five, 000, or 10,000 troops there. 1 what happened? >> well, first off, withha president obama, he really did not fulfill his campaign promisf literally of taking the troops out in 16 months.s he pretted much ended up takingly them out on george bush's schedule, the end of 2011. two, the other thing is what people don't realize is the t obama administration tried to de a lot more than just take troops out. they tried to re-engineer the govern
into the ballot box as a politician. there's a general election coming up here in pakistan. the first time potentially that one democratic government would hand over to another democratic government, believe it or not, for the first time in country's history. he believes that he's going to be a key player. but given the muted response he's had to his landing here so far and very little media coverage, it would seem that they have an uphill battle to make that race to the front so to speak here in the election coming up here. he -- as we said, he was unchallenged in the past, but now he wants to try and challenge all the big boys in pakistan's politics. well, it remains to be seen if he can manage that. >> well, that's the thing. he comes back and says he's coming back to in his words save the country. and yet he hasn't got a seat. he hasn't got much of a chance of getting 170 seats in the election one would imagine. meanwhile, what are the charges he's facing? and then as we said he's a guy that the taliban wants to take out. >> yes. absolutely. a couple of reality checks there aren't ther
in terms of supporting marriage equality, both in states in our country, in elected leadership, in business leadership, and it makes a difference when the supreme court decides what they embrace in terms of the breadth of their decision. the american people are way ahead of the judiciary, they have moved beyond it, people have embraced marriage equality. people under 30 support it by 81%. i think people have recognized this is a question of fundamental fairness, of basic notions of equality, and the supreme court has the responsibility to catch up to that. >> congressman, good to see you. thank you so much. anna, since we are talking money and politics, in your reporting you found republicans may be able to raise more money if they support same sex marriage, right? >> absolutely. we have talked to several gop fund-raisers. there's been a turnoff by the big donors in some of the socially liberal areas like new york, california, florida who feel like this last election was lost because there was too much focus on social issues. so there's a real drive in terms of trying to get some of this mo
for upcoming elections at a time when violence is on the rise. >> all right, here's your first look at your dish of scrambled politics. they're warming to the idea of same-sex marriage but many oppose marriage equality. karl rove signaled there could be a major shift in his party's outlook. >> karl rove, could you imagine a republican candidate saying i'm for gay marriage? >> i could. >> the supreme court begins arguments on it, the legality and one benefit to endorsing the notion with one strategist te telling politico opening up the idea will open up donors around the country. >>> zuckerberg is forming an issues advocacy organization focusing on comprehensive immigration reform. >>> rand paul doesn't want to legalize drugs but doesn't want them to go to jail either. >> the last two presidents could have conceivably been put in jail for drug use. it would have ruined their lives. it got lucky but a lot of poor kids don't get lucky. >> pending senate bill would give judges greater flexibility to work around mandatory minimum sentences for those crimes. >>> claire mccaskill is throwing her s
from easter recess. >>> well, some things only happen every four years. forget presidential elections, the olympics, leap years and this weekend, the senate did something it had not done in more than 1400 days, passed a budget. the all night session stretched from friday into the early hours of saturdays as senators dealt with amendments all over the place ranging from the keystone pipeline to eliminating tax breaks for fish tackle box manufacturers. no joke. it's true. passed a budget by a margin of one vote. >> now, the average budget resolution considered 78 amendments, we've done 101. average 35 amendments, we've done 70. twice as many. doing this has been a herculean feat. >> i know everyone is exhausted, and you may not feel it at the moment, but this is one of the senate's finest days in recent years and i commend everyone who's participated in this extraordinary debate. >> can't figure out if mr. in cane is awake. not a single republican supported the plan and four democrats each up for re-election next year also voted against their party's budget. the plan cuts $1.85 trillion
. they will elect a new secretary general, but by rewriting the constitution, the countries that have been pushing for international regulation of the internet will be able to take all their ideas a step forward. they've been very patient and persistent over the years, and they will not quit until their goals are realized. it sounds like black helicopter conspiracy theory stuff but, unfortunately, it's not as was evidenced in dubai last december. so i'm not optimistic. i'm in touch with our state department and our department of commerce both of who have a role here, and the good news here in the u.s. is that we're all unified, congress seems to be unified. we had a rare moment last year when there were house and senate resolutions passed unanimously by both chambers, really underscoring our country's view of internet freedom. and why that view is important to the developing world, for the future of the developing world. and that's what's really the motor heartbreaking here. there are a lot of -- most heartbreak here. there are a lot of nations that are signing on to this tree that that will under
to elect, sign up for that program, and that's why i think pg and e is projecting such a low percentage of enroll. , pg and e did offer a climate smart project which similarly had an elect to enroll component that had very low participation and they ultimately cancelled the program. >> will they mail them a notification to opt in with their bill, or how will the customers be notified of the option? >> i'm not sure what pg and e's marketing plan is for it, but i would assume a bill insert and those typical ways pg and e communicates would be used. that's certainly what they did with their climate smart program. >> thank you. commissioner mar? >> thank you, thank you, chair avalos, ms. hale, could you just explain what the geographical area of pg and e's territory is. er >> it serves most of northern california from about fresno north to the oregon border, from east to west, pg and e does not serve the north eastern portion of california or parts of the sierra nevada, and the northern part of the sierra nevada range. there are imbedded within that geography, i just described publicly owne
side, who got elected with 90% plus of african american vote, and what we see happening in inner cities around the country with gun violence, you know, there's a lot of work that we have to do in our mritpolitical systems, but one of the key things is really deal with money in politics. the overwhelming reach that these lobby groups like the nra can have in drowning out the voice of every day people. >> cenk: yeah, i think you are right. the assault weapons and high capacity magazines, they dropped those already. diane i want to go back back to wayne lapierre. let's watch this together. >> the whole thing universal checks is a dishonest premise. there is not a bill on the hill that provides a universal check. the shooters in tucson and arrow, newtown, they are not going to be checked. they are unrecognizable. diane how do you respond to that? >> well, it -- the logic doesn't make sense. if you follow that through, criminals don't respond to any law, okay. so if we are going to follow that through we wouldn't have passed any laws. we need to put obstacles in th
t moving into the next cycle of e elections and announced yesterday he is going to spend $12 million of his own money in the senate races. these are not even senate races. these are in states where he thinks we can get the votes from senators for the gun safety measures that are now in the u.s. senate. so this is the influence of gun safety legislation, including the assault weapons ban that president obama wants out of the senate. on "meet the press" yesterday, michael bloomberg said yeah, it's my own money and i think it's certainly appropriate that this is the way that i spend it. >> if i can do that by spending some money and taking the nra from being the only voice to being one of the voices so the public can really understand the issues, then i think my money would be well spent and i think i have an obligation to do that. >> bill: yes, i remember he did won, his candidate, i for get her name right now won that special e ladies and gentlemen to take reverend -- not reverent but jesse jackson, junior's seat in chicago. she didn't have a prayer un
%/43%. on election day in the network exit poll 49%/46%. >> hilary rosen -- >> it's clearly moved but the idea the american people are, you know, universally for same sex marriage is just not backed up. >> one of the things you look at, hilary, the youth vote. those who supported that poll, 81% under 30 support marriage equality. where are we as the supreme court takes this up? >> well, and another interesting part about the youth vote, unlike a lot of other issues that ralph works on, the evangelical yaut, according to alex lundry, mitt romney's data analyst, over 60% of evangelical youth support gay marriage. this has taken over the tide. i think the supreme court as good citizens as they are, are really going to decide this case based on what's fair and right based on the constitution, which is, is there a rational reason to treat two sets of loving couples differently under the law? >> david brooks, the country is divided. there are 41 states that either ban it or treat gay marriage as something different than tradition traditional marriage. does that matter? >> yeah, but i think the trend
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